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Types of Pottery

Detailed on this page are the various types of pottery produced by members of our studio.

Stoneware

Stoneware pottery is produced from clay that is fired to a dense, hard, vitreous state at a temperature of over 2300 degrees Fahrenheit. When stoneware is fired in kilns that burn gas, flames come in contact with the ware. Reducing or increasing the amount of oxygen entering the kiln allows the artist to control the atmosphere of the kiln, producing a wide range of glaze effects. Stoneware is used for making functional, durable pots. Stoneware pottery is food safe and will hold water.

Raku

Raku is a pottery firing technique dating back to 16th century Japan. Modern raku is loosely based on the ancient Japanese technique. When the glazed ware reaches the temperature of approximately 1800 degrees, it is placed in a pit containing combustible materials [for example, paper, pine, and sawdust]. The red-hot piece ignites the combustibles and the pit is then tightly covered to reduce the oxygen and stop the fire. Pots produced using the raku method are porous and fragile and are considered nonfunctional, decorative pieces. They do not hold water and should not be used for food or beverage.
Horsehair Raku pottery is coated several times with a very fine clay slip called terra sigillata and burnished. Pieces are then fired in the traditional manner of 16th Century Japanese Raku, removed from the kiln while hot, and horsehair is applied to the surface. The burning of the hair as it comes in contact with the piece creates dramatic unpredictable black carbon lines and smoke patterns. The pieces are cleaned and waxed to a satin finish. These pots are porous and fragile and are considered nonfunctional, decorative pieces. They do not hold water and should not be used for food or beverage.

Saggar

Saggar pottery is coated several times with a very fine clay slip called terra sigillata and burnished. Pieces are then fired inside of ceramic containers called saggars, which are packed with sawdust and a variety of combustible materials such as paper, copper wire, straw, seaweed, and colorants. The burning of the combustible materials as it comes in contact with the piece creates dramatic unpredictable carbon marks and smoke patterns. The pieces are cleaned and waxed to a satin finish. These pots are porous and fragile and are considered nonfunctional, decorative pieces. They do not hold water and should not be used for food or beverage.
News and Special Events
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Perennial Pots
June 3
Garden themed pottery sale outside and perennials from our gardens ...more
Summer Pottery Classes
June 7
Daytime summer pottery classes begin 6/13 and evening classes begin 6/7 ...go to classes

9 School Street • East Granby, CT 06026 | (860) 844-0138 | facebook icon       | artists@expressionspottery.com